Docker, Explained for “Old School” Developers

Docker, Explained for “Old School” Developers

Anyone writing code has probably seen a bunch of references to Docker by now. It’s like this new toy that’s all the rage, but for people like me — where picking up new things takes a crap-load more work than it used to — the general reaction is “I’ll learn that when it’s unavoidable.” Alas, a few weeks back it became unavoidable, and I’m here to report back.

If you’re even mildly inquisitive, a quick scan of Docker says a lot about containers and it’s pretty obvious that a container is some kind of virtual environment, but there’s not much that tells you why you should give a damn. I’m going to try to fix that. I’m not going to describe how to use Docker here, just what it’s for. There’s lots of great resources on making use of it elsewhere.

If you got into development in a time when your workplace had a nice air-conditioned room with raised floors and racks of servers and keyboard/console switches, then this post is for you.

The TL:DR on this is the learning curve here is a lot less than it seems at first, and the flexibility it gives you to set up and change configurations is truly powerful. Invest a few days in learning the basics and you can build, rebuild, and reconfigure virtual server rooms that significantly reduce the amount of time needed to maintain your own local environment. As a common example, if you’ve ever sworn at LAMP/ XAMP / MAMP configurations only to start from scratch or if you’ve tried to get two versions of just about anything running on the same system, then Docker definitely is for you.

(more…)